Right in the childhood

Doll (Babushka Cabaret, Little Black Dress Creatives)

Judith Wright Centre, Performance Space

May 20 – 23

Fairy-light lit and adorned with dolly accessories, the Judith Wright Centre Performance Space is transformed to capture the essence of “Doll”, bathed in pink and full of fun. As audience members enter this musical Barbie dreamhouse, they are tempted to see the world through a doll’s eyes, for this is a show about all the dolls in our lives: the cute, creepy and crude, and our experiences in treasuring and torturing them.

The dolls’ stories are both set to and punctuated by music, but not always through the song selection you may expect, with the night’s playlist eclectically including opera, 80s pop, nursery rhymes and rock and roll. Indeed, the innovative fusion of styles is what always sets Babushka apart and, as usual, its combination of classic repertoire and creative contemporary context makes for an engaging and highly entertaining show. The original arrangements are everything and, as always, Babushka present songs in ways that allow for different lyric interpretation and appreciation, including a marvellous, mournful, unplugged rendition of ‘Barbie Girl’ from pristine, porcelain-skinned princess Judy Dolly (Judy Hainsworth), who has never really lived outside of the box of her fantasy world.

Babushka_DOLL2_NickMorrissey

Boxed up in original packaging, Judy Dolly initially dominates the stage, from a visual perspective, however, the show’s focus is spread across a trio of toys, for there is also Alicia Doll (Alicia Cush) who is the manic, multitasking, overachiever mother, intent on starting a blog and eating more kale. And then there is international party girl Bethan Doll (Bethan Ellsmore), who has a glitter habit and runs on booze rather than batteries. Her checkered past means that her original accessories are long lost or since pawned, but boy can she sing, with Ellsmore frequently flooring the entire audience with her soaring operatic vocals.

While each doll is given its solo songs and opportunities to shine, the most magnificent moments are where their talents combine. The harmonious voices of the three performers and co-creators blend beautifully, both in emotional ballad and when blasting out some Gunners, all the time accompanied on piano by the talented Luke Volker. And to hear the group present their namesake Kate Bush song is always a treat.

Despite its playful premise, this is a show far from PG descriptor as focus moves to Judy Doll’s search for companionship c/o a blowup sex doll and also, what Barbie and Ken get up to behind closed doors. It is perhaps a little more ‘talky’ than necessary at times and takes a while to hit its stride, but when it does, with its audience involvement, the participation is minor and full of fun. And through all of its detours, there is no detraction from the show’s ultimate feminist questioning of the fantastic world of plastic, its message about how ‘it takes all types of dolls’ and the realisation that perhaps Barbie is not that bad after all.

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Babushka’s “Doll” has all the ingredients of good cabaret: laughs, gasps and a show of genuine talent, and is defiantly worth a visit. The fact that it is built upon such an imaginative premise is just an added bonus, guaranteed to get you, right in the childhood #inagoodway.

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