More Mockingbird

Tequila Mockingbird (shake & stir theatre company)

QPAC, Cremorne Theatre

October 5 – 15

Shake & Stir’s award-winning play “Tequila Mockingbird” transports its literary classic namesake tale of racial prejudice and the law to small town, rural Australia and the result is both poignant and palpable… for while the Stanton of “Tequila Mockingbird” may be nowhere specific, it is apparent before long that its story is one that is sadly familiar in our modern experience.

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The story begins when a young Indian doctor Sameer Chavan (Shannon Haegler) relocates to the tiny town to work in the medical centre. While the its born-and-bred residents drown their unemployment sorrows in schooners at Sue’s hotel, their attitudes are more archaic than nostalgic in their throwback to times of old and the racial intolerance he experiences soon crescendos into him being wrongly accused of assaulting a young woman (Nelle Lee), who is instead the victim of abuse by her vicious boyfriend Joel (Ross Balbuziente). When the whole town turns against Sameer, lawyer Richard (Bryan Proberts) not only defends him, but attempts to protect him from the simmering social tension.

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It is a taut story whose engagement is enhanced through its delineation from chronological narrative presentation, showing the audience the true events of the night in question only in flashback as part of Sameer’s trial. And even though the violence is not enacted on stage, its effect is no less shocking.

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The aspect that engenders audience attention the most, however, is the show’s stellar performances. Reuniting under the direction of Michael Futcher, each member of the original cast is totally convincing. Nellie Lee brings depth to the role of Rachel, a woman as trapped emotionally in her relationship as she is physically in the town and Ross Balbuziente gives a powerful, intimidating performance as the abusive Joel, passively racist until under the influence of alcohol. Barbara Lowing, however, is outstanding as she brings to vivid life three diverse characters: well-meaning publican Sue (trying to increase revenue with international nights featuring food and cocktails like ‘Tequila Mockingbird’), pretentious but well-meaning busy-body Karen and, most memorably as Joel’s drunken bigot mother Trish, utterly unlikeable but also very real in her xenophobia.

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Solid as ever, like Harper Lee’s Atticus Finch, Bryan Proberts’ Richard represents morality, reason and what we all want to be, never having to rethink his position. His stern but fair attitude also characterises his solo-parenting style and there is a natural rhythm to his scenes with his mischievous son Charlie (Nick Skubij). Likewise, Shannon Haegler brings a gentle humility to the role of Sameer.

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Simple but versatile staging and impressive lighting supports the story’s different phases. While Richard’s story is softened by subdued beiges, the hyper-reality of pub politics is illuminated by vibrant neon shades. And spotlighting serves to make the court scene all the more harrowing.

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While the story remains the same, as well should be the case with an award-winning work, the 2016 show is enhanced by some nice touches of update, particularly within the earlier scenes that serve as juxtaposition to the horror that follows. Both Skubij and Balbuziente contribute much to the frivolity when, in one of their respective multiple roles, they make their own fun as teenagers trapped in a town without entertainment. There is of course, a moment when things transition from the laughter of adolescent hijinks to increasingly less-thinly-veiled racist taunts and observation of altered audience reactions is as interesting as the comments that cause it.

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“Tequila Mockingbird” is critically-acclaimed for good reason and given the current political atmosphere in Australia, its turbulent, tension-filled story is sadly now more than ever more authentic than stereotypical. Not only does it provide insight into how our nation is regarded in overseas perception, but it clearly illustrates what can happen when fear and ignorance combine unchecked. The saddest thing of all, however, is not that tragedy that the narrative outlines but how it afterwards fades into history as its rural townsfolk move on to their more usual worries of weather forecasts and rising beef prices. Hopefully, artistic works such as this will assist in ensuring that such outcomes are rendered far from reality.

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