Sexism, satire and suggestion

NSFW (Underground Productions)

Schonell Cinema and Live Theatre

October 13 – 22

“NSFW”, the final 2016 work from Underground Productions, at first seems enigmatically titled, until its acronym is explained. NSWF stands for Not Safe For Work and refers to the kind of online material employees should not be accessing in the workplace. It is a grubby premise reflected in its opening scene in the offices of Doghouse men’s magazine, fit out, as they are, with sporting equipment and memorabilia, and provocative cover posters of bare-breasted posers. The employees swear and make sexual suggestions, all within just the opening few minutes … but that’s all ok, because it is all just a joke right?

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To the entitled employee Rupert (Kell Andersen) who claims of discrimination against his privilege and upends furniture in temper tantrum, it is all light-hearted.  Maybe not so for Charlotte (Olivia Hall-Smith) who lies to her woman’s group about where she works; it is not her dream but it’s something for her cv, it pays the rent and she just likes working. Tactical repositioning of the brand is put aside when it is revealed that well-meaning junior Sam (Matt McInally) has accidentally okayed topless cover shots of ‘local lovely’ Carrie, who is in fact only 14.

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As Rupert relishes in Sam’s error, it evolves that this is an unappealing story of unlikeable characters, not improved when Carrie’s job seeker dad (Greg Andreas) arrives to be callously manipulated into accepting a payoff from the magazine’s smooth operator boss Aiden (Rijen Mulgrew).

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The commitment of all performers is admirable. Andreas brings a modest realism to the role of Carrie’s dad, distanced from his daughter thanks to divorce and fully aware of her faults but wanting to protect her nevertheless. McInally is excellent as the awkward but essentially good buy Sam, sacked from Doghouse after the incident. His after-intermission monologue about the appeal of a sharing his life space with his girlfriend is moving in the honesty of its delivery.

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After a rushed resolution to this starting story, the audience follows Sam to the show’s second story, when, after months of unemployment he is being interviewed for another low-paid magazine position, this time at women’s glossy Electra. It initially appears to be another world to that of Doghouse, filled with champagne, free samples and a readership who ‘likes to think’, but before long it emerges that things are not so different after all.

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Here the corruption of values is embodied by editor Miranda (Jessica Palfrey) who, like any great mean girl, manipulates others into submission of agreement. The belief at Electra is that perfection is isolating and that any anxiety is valid. Accordingly, to qualify for the job, Sam is required to look at pictures of famous women and identify their physical flaws.

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From here the show staggers to its finish, with some scenes dragging a little past attention, such as when Miranda (yes, the script features a Carrie, Charlotte and Miranda), is going through ritual of getting ready in her office to a longer-than-needed Whitney Houston soundtrack. There are times too when more attention is needed to moving Lucy Kirkwood’ work from its UK origins, as references to the Broncos and Bulldogs for example, only highlight the still-Britishness of mention of UK make-over queens Trinny and Susannah.

Although inconsistent in its engagement, “NSFW” is more than just a satirical attack on the world of magazine journalism. Its juxtaposition of the brash world of Doghouse and Electra’s more passively aggressive approach, not only highlights the hypocrisy of sexism, but suggests that there is still much to talk about in relation to sexual harassment and the media’s objectification of women.

Photos c/o –  https://www.facebook.com/UndergroundBrisbane

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