Doll debauchery

Doll (Babushka)

Brisbane Powerhouse, Visy Theatre

November 24 – 27

As far as cabarets go, Babushka’s “Doll” is right up there in terms of craziness as it takes audience members along a trip down memory lane (of sorts) through examination of dolls in all their guises – cute, creepy and crude – and our experiences in treasuring and torturing them…. from their perspectives.

Crowded with accessories, the Visy Theatre stage is pinker than the Barbie aisle at Kmart. The increased intimacy compared to the show’s last Brisbane outing brings some virtues, however, such as allowing for a more commanding unplugged, mournful performance of ‘Barbie Girl’ from Judy Doll (Judy Hainsworth). Appropriately animated and over-the-top in her princessness , she takes audiences through her longing to know of life outside of her box, before also singing of her Bonnie-Tyler like need for a hero. And when she gets down and dirty with bursts of Missy Elliott’s ‘Get Ur Freak On’ during the trio’s terrific take of ‘The Clap Song, it is absolutely hilarious.

judy

Even so, it is Bethan Doll (Bethan Ellsmore), who is the naughtiest, sculling audience champagne as she tells of her wild life going from bargain bin to garden shed, in contrast to Alicia Doll (Alicia Cush) who multi-tasks about the place intent to overcome modern motherhood pressures and have it all.

Together the trio’s voices meld in perfect harmony in songs as such ‘You’re My Best Friend’ and when Ellsmore and Cush add opera’s most famous duet for sopranos, ‘The Flower Duet’ to Garbage’s ‘Cherry Lips’, they make for some sublime musical moments. This number also serves as perfect illustration of just what makes Babushka so special; their combination of classic (and classical) works with pop culture pieces in a contemporary context is inspired. And when Ellsmore blasts of Guns and Roses’ ‘Sweet Child of Mine’ in the show’s closing number, it is worth the price admission alone.

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Despite all the pinkness, things are not all froth and bubble. Pre-show play of Destiny’s Child’s ‘Independent Women’ signposts the show’s essential theme of empowerment, which is further emphasised by the dolls’ delivery of ‘When I Realised I was a Girl’ and some updated political references. Whether tongue-in-cheek or of more serious message, transitions between dialogue and music are always absolutely seamless, exploiting in the most wonderful of ways the different lyric interpretations that unpin the show’s premise.

As always, “Doll” is a simultaneously stylish and sassy show. Its balance of commentary and song is perfect and its dips in to the dark world of sex dolls and Ken and Barbie’s usually behind-closed-doors sessions, make it ideal for the debaucherous end-of-year carnival of circus, comedy, music, physical theatre, magic and burlesque that is Wonderland.

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