Sondheim songs and secrets

Boys of Sondheim (Understudy Productions)

Brisbane Powerhouse, Turbine Studio

February 2 – 4

Stephen Sondheim is not only one of the most significant gay artists of the 20th century but one of the greatest musical theatre composer and lyricists in history. To celebrate the works of the award-winning composer in cabaret-concert is, on its own, a champion idea. To do with a talented cast that includes Kurt Phelan (“Dirty Dancing” Australian tour as Johnny Castle), Sean Andrews (“Phantom of The Opera” the International Asian tour), Tim Carroll (“Grease The Arena Experience” with Harvest Rain), Alexander Woodward (“Grease The Arena Experience” with Harvest Rain), and Stephen Hirst (“Into The Woods”), makes “Boys of Sondheim” more than just a salute to Sondheim’s songs.

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From its jazzy opening sounds, there is a clear intimate, tongue-in-cheek elegance to its share of Sondheim songs that are mostly sung by women, reappropriated and cleverly curated together to guide the audience along an emotional journey of relationships for gay men, from the anxiety of Hirst’s introductory ‘Everyone’s Got the Right to Love’ from “Assassins” to Phelan’s ‘I Feel Pretty’ insecurity (from “West Side Story”). With monologues capturing the essence of what it is to be a gay man in modern Australia, it is a concept that works well without any change of original lyrics, resulting in many tender moments, including Phelan and Woodward’s sumptuous take on the ballad ‘Unworthy of Your Love’, also from “Assassins” and share of the melodious pain of ‘Send in the Clowns’ From “A Little Night Music” by Andrews in duet with Hirst.

In preparation for the pathos, there is a lot of early humour courtesy of witty dialogue and animated delivery, including an upbeat ‘Buddies Blues’ from “Follies” by Caroll and a naughty take of ‘I Know Things Now’ from “Into the Woods’ by Phelan. All the performers have an engaging stage presence, however, Phelan is a versatile standout as he shows off his ‘hot young thing’ dance moves in a gorgeous ‘Sooner or Later’ from “Dick Tracey”.

The secret joy of Sondheim’s music is the songs are often ones you don’t realise you know, which adds to joy of re-discovery of the show’s mix, including songs from “Company”, ‘The Little Things You Do Together’ and “Getting Married Today’, which features Hirst’s rapid fire lyrics juxtaposed with Phelan’s top falsetto, to wonderful comic effect. And thanks to the musical direction of Dominic Woodhead (also on piano), and Michael Thrum on sax and clarinet, and Kirsten Baade on bass, every number is musically on-point in its poignancy and intricate melody.

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Drawing from ten musicals, five performers, a three piece band and one composer, Director Kris Stewart has created a sensational work of celebration, with a twist. Not only does it take audiences on a journey though Sondheim’s songs, but, “Boys of Sondheim” presents a honest and heartfelt exploration of males trying to find place in the world, perfect for inclusion in Brisbane Powerhouse’s Melt Festival celebration of queer arts and culture.

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