Globalisation gets personal

Rice (Queensland Theatre)

The Greenhouse, Bille Brown Studio

June 24 – July 16

“Rice” is a deceptively simple story of two women working in the city: one is a struggling cleaner, while the other is a high flying manager; one a migrant from China, while the other is a second general Brisbane girl whose grandmother moved here from West Bengal. Yet, it in tale of families and friendships, it isn’t long before it becomes so much more.

It begins with ambitious ­corporate climber Nisha (Kristy Best), unhappy with the office’s Chinese cleaner Yvette (Hsiao-Liang Tang) for not disposing of her after-hours takeaway rubbish. ‘Indian princess and ‘Chinese cleaner’ is all they see when in confrontation with each other, however, although they are from different generations and different cultures, as time passes they find themselves helping each other navigate their complex lives.

Rice.jpg

This navigation is aided by the additional characters that the talented actors each adopt, never losing their essential chemistry, as they assume roles as diverse as hipster boyfriend, ungrateful daughter, Indian official and Russian cleaning crew supervisor. Certainly, the dramatic use of actors playing multiple characters is a bold theatrical device that can have its ups and downs and initial jumps are jarring, however, once accustomed to the style, audience members can easily appreciate the value this adds to the show’s momentum, which is readily maintained through its taut 90 minute duration, with characters volleying dialogue from across either side of the wide stage.

An abundance of Brisbane references add interest and a memorable soundscape enhances plot and thematic aspects alike, while its minimalist stage design rightly allows the show’s outstanding performances to bring Michele Lee’s script to life. The script is an impressive one, filled with humourous one-liners and realistic dialogue, but also a Brechtian self-awareness and acknowledgement of the presence of the audience a voyeurs. (“This is the part where we eat,” we are told, for example, as they share a Monday night meal in the office). And its lack or resolve is refreshing in its realism.

“Rice” is a fresh and refreshing show, worthy of its Queensland Premier’s Drama Award. While it is as its tagline promises, “an insightful story about the personal side of globalisation,” what it is really about is life through the lens of two equally strong and vulnerable women, which makes it an engaging show from which attention never wanes.

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