Roving recollections

Rovers (Belloo Creative)

Theatre Republic, The Block

September 11 – 15

One of last month’s Melbourne Writers Festival unorthodox special events, Second Last Rites, saw Australian actress, comedian and writer Magda Szubanski giving over to the one party she never thought she could attend, her own funeral.  Katherine Lyall-Watson’s “Rovers” is a little like that. It’s a wake though, not a funeral, we are reminded, so serves as celebration of a life lived… in all of its roving yet intertwined memories and experiences, the beginning, ending and everything in between. Some are real and some are creations, but in the hands of two of Brisbane’s best-loved and most accomplished actors, Roxanne McDonald and Barbara Lowing, all are quite entertaining.

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Immediately the new comedy-drama from all-female company Belloo Creative is quite meta not just in its outline of the wake theme and warning about the possibility of ‘copping an eyeful of middle-aged flesh’, but also mocked berate of Technical Manager Jeremy for turning out the lights and the ongoing appearance of the stage hand allegedly responsible for the less than perfect prop appearances. It is all very playful and lots of fun as a kaleidoscope of recollections collide, as they do in life. This is especially so in its early scene recall of the childhood memories of the Bogeyman and ‘when-I-grow-up’ ambitions, more intense now than ever with age. And the show’s minimalist set design and stirring soundtrack means that we imagine a lot, as tyres become horses and alike.

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It begins with Lowing descending from a desert water tank to meet up with McDonald and from there, the journey through their memories unfolds as the ‘two old girls’ reunite on-stage after more than 20 years. It is a trip through the heart lines of their own lives in revisit of the adventure of the women who made them who they are today, including Barbara Toy (Lowing’s namesake great Aunt) who crossed deserts and warzones in her trusty Land Rover, Pollyanna.

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It’s a journey, too that has storytelling at its core, unique due to its personal nature and weave from the tapestry of truth. And the dynamic duo present it as quite the yarn. Indeed, their warmth and genuine enjoyment in its share, emphasises the sincerity of its sentiment and rather than making it overly sentimental, its intimacy only adds to its appeal.

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At its core, “Rovers” serves as a reminder that Australia breeds its women tough. But behind the strength is also an essential and enticing charm; these are characters with whom you’d love to have a cup of tea and a natter, or maybe share a hip flask swig. There is a real authenticity to its dialogue and lots of humour too, especially courtesy of McDonald’s straight-talking observations as the fearless Jessie Miller in her fashionable hat.

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They may not, as they tell us, do it for the money, but we are certainly glad that they do and under Caroline Dunphy’s direction, the hour-long share of outback tales of trailblazing women flies by as audience imaginations are invigorated and inspired to be, know and raise strong women. It’s like “Thelma and Louise” in terms of defiance, only with an uplifting ending – charming, comforting and colourful, with even a few surprises.

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