Familiar fables reframed

Happily Ever After (Little Match Productions in partnership with Brisbane Powerhouse)

Brisbane Powerhouse, Visy Theatre

November 29 – December 1

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Straight from a sold-out Queensland tour, the three talented princess of Babushka are back in the magical land of Brisbane to turn your favourite bedtime stories inside out as, along with their trusty companion Sir Luke-a-lot (Luke Volger) on piano, the trio bring their own brand of fairy tale to the fabled kingdom of New Farm with “Happily Ever After”.

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As with the group’s earlier “Doll”, there is an immediate appeal to the show’s colour and infectious energy, enhanced by the performers animated and over-the-top characterisations. The divas’ princess personas are clear from the start with their costume nods to Snow White (Alicia Cush), Rapunzel (Judy Hainsworth) and Red Riding Hood (Bethan Ellsmore).

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While each princess performer is given individual opportunities to shine, the most magnificent moments are actually where their talents combine. The harmonious voices of the three performers and co-creators meld melodically in, for example, Lorde’s ‘Royals’ and Eurythmics’ ‘Sweet Dreams’, the latter also featuring violin accompaniment from Ellsmore.

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In true Babuska style, there is more to “Happily Ever After” than there first may appear. There is a theme of female empowerment at the core of its fable reframes for modern maidens, perfectly tempered to be neither too in-your-face or too subtle to succeed, but in true fairy-tale fashion, just right in placement and plentifulness. What also makes Babushka so special is their unique reappropriation of familiar songs for new thematic purposes. Hainsworth’s tale of a down and dirty Cinderella to Rihanna’s ‘Umbrella’, for example, is an appreciated audience favourite, full of humour. And their reinvigoration of old-school song mashup of Madonna and Duran Duran is inspired.

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With their magical maestro in skilful musical support, the group presents songs in ways that allow for different lyric interpretation and appreciation, which makes for a dynamic cabaret experience. Full of fun one minute and darky seductive the next, “Happily Ever After” cleverly takes audiences from Britney to Metallica in its inside out turn of childhood favourites. The result is not only musically accomplished but wickedly funny.

Photos c/o – Natalia Muszkat

Doll debauchery

Doll (Babushka)

Brisbane Powerhouse, Visy Theatre

November 24 – 27

As far as cabarets go, Babushka’s “Doll” is right up there in terms of craziness as it takes audience members along a trip down memory lane (of sorts) through examination of dolls in all their guises – cute, creepy and crude – and our experiences in treasuring and torturing them…. from their perspectives.

Crowded with accessories, the Visy Theatre stage is pinker than the Barbie aisle at Kmart. The increased intimacy compared to the show’s last Brisbane outing brings some virtues, however, such as allowing for a more commanding unplugged, mournful performance of ‘Barbie Girl’ from Judy Doll (Judy Hainsworth). Appropriately animated and over-the-top in her princessness , she takes audiences through her longing to know of life outside of her box, before also singing of her Bonnie-Tyler like need for a hero. And when she gets down and dirty with bursts of Missy Elliott’s ‘Get Ur Freak On’ during the trio’s terrific take of ‘The Clap Song, it is absolutely hilarious.

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Even so, it is Bethan Doll (Bethan Ellsmore), who is the naughtiest, sculling audience champagne as she tells of her wild life going from bargain bin to garden shed, in contrast to Alicia Doll (Alicia Cush) who multi-tasks about the place intent to overcome modern motherhood pressures and have it all.

Together the trio’s voices meld in perfect harmony in songs as such ‘You’re My Best Friend’ and when Ellsmore and Cush add opera’s most famous duet for sopranos, ‘The Flower Duet’ to Garbage’s ‘Cherry Lips’, they make for some sublime musical moments. This number also serves as perfect illustration of just what makes Babushka so special; their combination of classic (and classical) works with pop culture pieces in a contemporary context is inspired. And when Ellsmore blasts of Guns and Roses’ ‘Sweet Child of Mine’ in the show’s closing number, it is worth the price admission alone.

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Despite all the pinkness, things are not all froth and bubble. Pre-show play of Destiny’s Child’s ‘Independent Women’ signposts the show’s essential theme of empowerment, which is further emphasised by the dolls’ delivery of ‘When I Realised I was a Girl’ and some updated political references. Whether tongue-in-cheek or of more serious message, transitions between dialogue and music are always absolutely seamless, exploiting in the most wonderful of ways the different lyric interpretations that unpin the show’s premise.

As always, “Doll” is a simultaneously stylish and sassy show. Its balance of commentary and song is perfect and its dips in to the dark world of sex dolls and Ken and Barbie’s usually behind-closed-doors sessions, make it ideal for the debaucherous end-of-year carnival of circus, comedy, music, physical theatre, magic and burlesque that is Wonderland.

Superlative songstresses

Women in Voice

Judith Wright Centre, Performance Space

November 3 – 12

Brisbane’s iconic cabaret institution “Women in Voice” is about celebrating individuality of entertainers from different musical backgrounds and generations. As such, its performers not only become backup for each other’s numbers, but are left to independently select songs. …. All except Bethan Ellsmore who has stepped in to the show as replacement for Sahara Beck at only 24 hours’ notice. Joining this year’s formidable line up of talented soloists, Alicia Cush, Leah Cotterell and Allison St Ledger, Ellsmore provides a pure-voiced set of songs beginning with a beautiful take of Split Enz’s ‘I Hope I Never’ and soon has the audience swaying along to the sounds of ‘Blue Velvet’. It is a selection that sits well against the night’s eclectic musical line-up.

The show opens with a melodic take on The Church’s signature ‘Under The Milky Way’, as Alicia Cush takes the audience through a musical study of home. Proving her immense talent, she transports listeners through operatic highs and smooth country sounds before finishing with a jazzy Bublé number, inset with her own flute solo.  The soulful Leah Cotterell then roars the audience to intermission in a set that includes a mix of original and well-known numbers… including another Oz-rock classic with The Angels’ ‘Am I Ever Gonna See Your Face Again’, complete with expletive-laden audience response.

The packed opening night audience, full of ‘girls night out’ groups, loved every minute of music and more. As emcee, Judy Hainsworth entertains in jester role, complete with changing brightly coloured, motley costume, taking the audience on a tongue-in-cheer tour of the year that has been and a musical recap of the life of a performer on tour, amongst other journeys. Transporting audiences to another time or place is part of the magic of live performance and the show’s final set, from “Women in Voice” royalty Alison St Ledger, does exactly this as she takes the audience on a fabulously fun trip down retro-memory lane to Jackson Five and Bee Gee boogie, completed with disco dudette while suit.

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As always, “Women in Voice” is an immensely entertaining musical experience, thanks also to the accomplished live band (under Musical Director Stephen Russell). When the superlative songstresses come together to look towards the good things to come in a concluding Cat Stevens’ ‘Peace Train’ it is a glorious, goosebumpy moment proving that more than just another song concert, “Women in Voice” is a celebration of talent, that, like any good celebration, is best enjoyed when shared with ‘the more the merrier’ as a mantra.

Right in the childhood

Doll (Babushka Cabaret, Little Black Dress Creatives)

Judith Wright Centre, Performance Space

May 20 – 23

Fairy-light lit and adorned with dolly accessories, the Judith Wright Centre Performance Space is transformed to capture the essence of “Doll”, bathed in pink and full of fun. As audience members enter this musical Barbie dreamhouse, they are tempted to see the world through a doll’s eyes, for this is a show about all the dolls in our lives: the cute, creepy and crude, and our experiences in treasuring and torturing them.

The dolls’ stories are both set to and punctuated by music, but not always through the song selection you may expect, with the night’s playlist eclectically including opera, 80s pop, nursery rhymes and rock and roll. Indeed, the innovative fusion of styles is what always sets Babushka apart and, as usual, its combination of classic repertoire and creative contemporary context makes for an engaging and highly entertaining show. The original arrangements are everything and, as always, Babushka present songs in ways that allow for different lyric interpretation and appreciation, including a marvellous, mournful, unplugged rendition of ‘Barbie Girl’ from pristine, porcelain-skinned princess Judy Dolly (Judy Hainsworth), who has never really lived outside of the box of her fantasy world.

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Boxed up in original packaging, Judy Dolly initially dominates the stage, from a visual perspective, however, the show’s focus is spread across a trio of toys, for there is also Alicia Doll (Alicia Cush) who is the manic, multitasking, overachiever mother, intent on starting a blog and eating more kale. And then there is international party girl Bethan Doll (Bethan Ellsmore), who has a glitter habit and runs on booze rather than batteries. Her checkered past means that her original accessories are long lost or since pawned, but boy can she sing, with Ellsmore frequently flooring the entire audience with her soaring operatic vocals.

While each doll is given its solo songs and opportunities to shine, the most magnificent moments are where their talents combine. The harmonious voices of the three performers and co-creators blend beautifully, both in emotional ballad and when blasting out some Gunners, all the time accompanied on piano by the talented Luke Volker. And to hear the group present their namesake Kate Bush song is always a treat.

Despite its playful premise, this is a show far from PG descriptor as focus moves to Judy Doll’s search for companionship c/o a blowup sex doll and also, what Barbie and Ken get up to behind closed doors. It is perhaps a little more ‘talky’ than necessary at times and takes a while to hit its stride, but when it does, with its audience involvement, the participation is minor and full of fun. And through all of its detours, there is no detraction from the show’s ultimate feminist questioning of the fantastic world of plastic, its message about how ‘it takes all types of dolls’ and the realisation that perhaps Barbie is not that bad after all.

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Babushka’s “Doll” has all the ingredients of good cabaret: laughs, gasps and a show of genuine talent, and is defiantly worth a visit. The fact that it is built upon such an imaginative premise is just an added bonus, guaranteed to get you, right in the childhood #inagoodway.