Courtly comedy and cake

Let Them Eat Cake (Act/React)

Golden Pig Cooking School

May 11 – 13

madame.jpgUpon leaving “The Play That Goes Wrong” opening night last week, I didn’t think I could even laugh quite so hard at a show… then along came “Let Them Eat Cake”, a slice of silly improvised shenanigans presented as part of the 2017 Anywhere Theatre Festival. The work comes from the creative minds of those at Act/React, the improv troupe responsible for the smash, sell-out hits “Speed: The Movie, The Play” and “Titanic: the Movie, The Play” at the Brisbane Powerhouse and it is just as funny as its predecessor works, making it a clear Festival highlight. It is not a movie re-imagining this time though, but rather a farce which sees all sorts of French court characters revealed in all sorts of scandalous and hysterical situations.

Versailles can be a tough place, especially for a mime, we learn as the show begins with lone mime, Pierre (Dan Beeston) on stage. And though the front row of the audience may occupy his predominant interest, there really is no hiding anywhere as audience belongings are reappropriate to become the show’s religious relic props. It is soon apparent that he is not an ordinary mime.

mime.jpg

Pretty Pierre has the pottiest of mouths (despite never speaking) and he may have done pornography. He is servant to the ambitious widow Madame Celeste (Natalie Bochenski, with a wig as large as her dress’ bussle) and so, spends initial scenes penning a dictated letter to her niece. Madame Celeste has money problems so quests to wed a wealthy, but boring, aristocrat Hugo (Wade Robinson), who may be after a top level wife but settles for Celeste, despite her having a little bit of the plague.

count.jpg

Gossipy court news travels fast and a Cardinal is soon also on the scene to stake his claim and confess his from-afar love for Celeste. It’s far from a France of polite parlour games with trickery, theft and bribery unfolding as audience suggestions contribute to the spontaneity of the largely ad-libbed show, ensuring that it travels in directions so random as to leave the actors themselves sometimes struggling to maintain composure. The deliberate overacting only adds to the exaggerated, improbable and farcical situations. But the absurdity is all part of the fun, especially when mention is made of chicken grenades.

Relent from the riotous laughter comes with interval, when, courtesy of the host venue, the audience is treated to rose water cupcakes, in honour of Queen Marie Antoinette’s supposed quote upon learning that the French peasants had no bread. The Golden Pig Cooking School is a wonderful venue for the experience too, full of atmosphere, enhanced by the show’s ongoing musical accompaniment from Richard Grantham on viola. Still, nothing is as memorable as the unfolding hilarity, thanks to the comic skill and timing of its players, vocally overemphasising where necessary as signpost to the weird and wacky directions of the plot and bouncing good-naturedly off each other and the audience. And in Dan Beeston’s hands, this mime needs no words to make many of the show’s funniest jokes.

“Let Them Eat Cake” is clever comedy all around. With its revisits to previous mentions and provision of associated puns, it shows that sometimes spontaneous can be best.  This is funny in its purest form as the dialogue, action, story and even aspects of the characters are created by the players and audience in collaboration and it is not only its abrupt ending that will leave its audiences wanting more. Hopefully Brisbane will see more of the show soon because as comedies go, this interactive farce really takes the cake.

Advertisements