Guilty pleasure pop

The Bodyguard The Musical (John Frost, Michael Harrison and David Ian)

QPAC, Lyric Theatre

July 19 – August 13

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“The Bodyguard The Musical” begins with a bang… literally… with gunshots and a full production number of lasers, lights and flame projections as superstar Rachel Marron (Paulini Curuenavuli of Australian Idol fame in her musical theatre debut) rocks out ‘Queen of the Night’. The melodramatic story then (more or less) follows its source material, the 1992 Warner Bros film starring Whitney Houston as the pop diva and Kevin Cosner as former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer, the reluctant bodyguard brought in to protect her (and later falling into a relationship with her) when an obsessive stalker starts making threats.

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The movie spawned one of the best-selling soundtracks of all time and it is upon this merit that the musical relies, ebbing and flowing through upbeat numbers and ballads alike. Unlike “Dirty Dancing”, this screen-to-stage adaptation does not attempt to provide an on-stage carbon copy of the film. The original screenplay has been significantly reduced to make space for more of Whitney Houston’s back-catalogue. This makes for unsatisfying narrative, but also a pleasing live experience, packed with pop classics, including from the contribution of Prinnie Stevens as Rachel’s jealous, overlooked sister Nicki, whose impressive vocals make ‘Saving All My Love For You’ a highlight.

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Humour comes courtesy of added scenes such as one set in a karaoke bar where a trio of tipsy girls sing their way through Houston’s ‘Where Do Broken Hearts Go?’ before unsuspectingly hearing it from Rachel Marron herself. It also provides opportunity for soap star Kip Gamblin to contribute more but a commanding presence to his bodyguard role, as he reluctantly delivers a deliberately pitch-poor (and very funny) ‘I Will Always Love You’.

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Curuenavuli is no Whitney Houston, and she’s clearly more singer than actor (especially with addition of American accent), but vocally she more than does justice to the central role. She is blistering in performance of Houston power ballads like ‘I Have Nothing’ and her delivery of the soundtrack’s carrier soul ballad ‘I Will Always Love You’ is flawless, beginning with goosebumpy a cappella introduction before soaring (literally) into the chorus.

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As stage musicals go “The Bodyguard The Musical” has its share of flaws in staging, pacing and acting performance. And its wafer-thin script is full of clichés. But still it serves as the guiltiest of pleasures, particularly in moments like a club performance scene mash-up of ‘I Wanna Dance with Somebody’ and ‘So Emotional’. And when the ensemble has audience members on their feet for an encore ‘I Wanna Dance’ reprise, it is a sing-along that carries out into the foyer post-show. Indeed, the main reason to see the “The Bodyguard The Musical” is its score, both of songs from the 1992 movie and Houston’s extensive pop catalogue.

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